3 Essential Analytics Insights for eCommerce Businesses
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3 Essential Analytics Insights for eCommerce Businesses


Hi, I’m Ben Fitzpatrick – I’m Head of Operations at Web Profits. Today I’m going to share three analytics insights that can help you grow your eCommerce business. Let’s get into it. First off, I’m assuming that you’re already across your primary data such as your transactions and revenue, your most effective channels and sources, and your campaign data. Right now we’re not talking about metrics – we’re talking about the questions you should be asking to go beyond the data to find key insights into your customers, your marketing and your business. The first place where we’ll find new insights is through your internal site search report. This shows you the terms people search within your website – and it’s really helpful in determining what your customers want or what they’re confused by. Here’s some questions to be asking when you look at the data: What percent of visitors are actually using the site search? If it’s a high number, does it mean that they’re struggling to find what they need? What are their most common searches? Can you use this information to improve your Google Ads campaigns? Or are there creative campaigns you can run based on these queries? Or could your rearrange some of your products to feature those that are being searched for most? Maybe they’re searching for products you have in stock but they’re using different names. Regardless of what you find, I recommend trying the searches yourself to see what experinces your website offers. Another question to ask is what pages are people searching from? The home page is to be expected – but are there any that stick out as surprising? Maybe you need to improve the experience on some pages where people seem to regularly leave through a search. Our next area to find insights is the Time to Purchase and Sessions to Purchase section of your analytics. This view allows you to see how long it generally takes between someone first visiting your site and then finally converting. And as an eCommerce business, you really need to understand well this customer journey. Here’s some things to focus on when reviewing this information: What percentage of visitors generally convert on their first visit to the site? This question alone can help inform how you want to prioritise marketing channels which may be more expensive but drive qualified traffic – specifically search advertising. Next you should ask how many sessions do visitors generally need before they’re ready to make a purchase and whether there’s a period of time after which people simply don’t convert. Answers to these questions can help you to effectively develop your funnel. It also can inform how you want to leverage remarketing and email marketing activity which generally come after the initial awareness stage. It’s important though to keep in mind here that this data is going to be skewed to a certain degree by your current marketing. What you’re looking for is data that differs from what you’d expect. Our last focus area for today is the Model Comparison Tool. This is where you’re able to compare different attribution models. In my opinion, one of the biggest mistakes you can make when looking at your data in Analytics is taking the conversion data at face value. This is because by default Google Analytics data is showing you conversion metrics based on the Last Click interaction. And there are lots of ways this skews your data and insights. In particular, it generally gives too much weight to the most common last click paths, such as branded search or direct traffic. The model comparison tool is a great place to start to go deeper. Here you can review some different attribution models – such as First Click which gives data based on how visitors first came to your website, or Time Decay which gives more credit to the visits closest in time to the final conversion. Here’s some questions you should be asking. What channels improve the most when you move from last click to first click attribution? These may be the channels that are driving your initial awareness – and therefore not getting the credit they deserve in Google Analytics’ default model. Are these being overlooked within your marketing planning? Another question to ask is if there are any channels which jump out at you as more or less effective when you review other models such as time decay or linear. Especially if your business has a long sales cycle, these may be the channels which are effective through the consideration phase of your funnel but not likely to drive last click conversions. Once you begin to better understand the different attribution models, you can really start to effectively look at all stages of your marketing funnel to find new opportunities and ensure your campaigns are working together effectively. That’s it for today. If you have any questions about these three focus areas, just leave a question in the comments and I’ll get back to you. And if you want to organise an Analytics consulting session to get deeper into your data, you can email me directly. Thanks for watching.

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